The Top Reasons Why Families Fall Out

Families can be tricky because, there are so many expectations yet, so many variables, especially between different generations. What Grandma, or Grandad consider to be ‘the norm’ and, a given, may very well be viewed differently by the mother or, more likely, the granddaughter or grandson. Take sexual orientation, for example, as long as neither party is harming anybody then their relationship shouldn’t concern anybody else whatsoever, but it might do.

Money, sex, jealousy, say no more

Interestingly enough, when asked, most people will say that money, sexual orientation and or jealousy making them the most common reasons for a family row, or something more serious like a separation. The same studies also show that the likelihood of a row or separation were more likely within certain demographics with the most deprived sitting at the top of the list.

Based upon various pieces of research across a variety of countries, you could ‘guesstimate’ that around a third of the world has had a ‘broken’ relationship with one of their relatives for ten years, or more which indicates that it’s a really serious matter and one that people find difficult to resolve by themselves.

The families that were most successful at rebuilding broken relationships or, at least dealing with the matter had all used lawyer services something similar to, CK Lawyers Family Lawyers who can help mediate and of course, make sure any legalities are dealt with in the proper manner.

It must be an age thing

Overall, when looking at who the most rows are between, brothers and sisters seems to be top trumps which is no surprise really, there’s always going to be an element of sibling rivalry. When looking at the severity of the row or, separation and the reason for it though, around two thirds of the siblings asked said that money was the driver being their ‘falling out’. It almost goes hand in hand with elderly family members and the subject of wills and estate planning which is also one of the biggest contributors towards money related dramas.

Perhaps even more surprising is that nearly half of all children asked said that they don’t speak with their parents and, instead of getting better over time, the records detail that the ‘nearly half’ turns into two thirds when the children reach the age of eighteen, what ever happened to having a kiss and a cuddle and, making up?