Different parent styles – their effects on children

Parental styles are usually spoken in terms of authoritarian parenting, authoritative parenthood and permissive parenting. What are the effects that everyone has on the child receiving parenthood? How different will a child be when exposed to different parent styles? And what is the good and the best parent style to use?

Studies (eg by Goodman and Gurian, 1999) indicated that children who have had authoritarian parenting with strict parents are often unable to think about themselves or understand why some behaviors are needed. It would have meaning as they are raised to do things without questioning them. It is almost the direct opposite of permissive parenting methods. Children with authoritarian parents are often withdrawn or anxious and with low self-esteem levels. Boys can also show anger and challenge as they get older. Authority parenting leads much less often to these characteristics.

Permissive parenthood, often known as “indulgent” parenthood, has been demonstrated in immature and impulsive behavior, with an inclination to disobedience and rebellion. The boys of permissive parents are often likely to be weak means, certainly less than children exposed to an authoritative parental style, as well as less than the children of the authoritarian parental method. Boys are often less motivated than girls in terms of education, which adds weight to the link between indulgent parenting and the low implementation.

Studies on authoritative parenthood have shown that children exposed to this “democratic” parent style are best adjusted. While authoritarian parenting can often lead to differences in behavior between boys and girls, children of authoritative parents show fewer differences in behavior between the genders. They tend to reach higher notes to school, be more useful at home and have fewer social problems. Although the differences between strict parenting and authority parenthood are obvious, there are also differences between children exposed to permissive parenthood and children in this group.

Whatever your parent style, all you do will be somehow affecting your child. Although it is very unlikely that all parents fall perfectly in one of the categories, it is clear from studies and reports that the authoritative parental style is the most successful. Authority parenthood is often considered hard and intimidation and permissive parenting does not give children the executives and borders they need. If you like your kids and think about how your actions are shaping their future, you may go well.